USE OF CRUTCHES : ON LEVEL SURFACES: • Crutch tips should be approximately 6" in front and 6" to the side of both legs. Tip: Ask a friend to carry one of your crutches while you climb or descend stairs. 6. Most times, injury to any part of the leg can be so severe and hurtful. Take care not to put weight on your bad leg. Full and partial weight bearing style of walking Going up stairs 1. Hold both crutches in one hand, on the side of your surgical/injured leg. H��W�n9��� If going down multiple steps, repeat this pattern until you have reached the bottom. Hold both crutches under your opposite arm. Move your injured leg forward and put your foot even with the crutches. Scoot forward in the chair to make it easier to stand. These instructions are specifically for patients that are partial weight bearing (PWB). For example, if you are 25% PWB, you may place 25% of your bodyweight through this leg. %PDF-1.3 %���� It’s simple while walking by a crutch without bearing body weight. 20 0 obj <>/Metadata 15 0 R/OutputIntents[16 0 R]/Pages 14 0 R/StructTreeRoot 54 0 R/Type/Catalog/ViewerPreferences<>>> endobj 15 0 obj <>stream Always slow down the speed when you have to transfer the injured leg by pushing harder on your crutches for a non-weight bearing. Remember to keep partial weight bearing on the stairs. • Step through with your unaffected leg while taking some of your weight through your hands and some through your injured leg. They are less likely to fall over this way. (If there’s no handrail, keep one crutch under each arm.) Lower the crutches down, step down with your surgical/injured leg, then step down with your non-surgical/non-injured leg. Stand up with weight on both feet but favouring your unaffected side. The “swing to” method of walking, sometimes called gait, is easy to learn and takes less arm strength and balance. Using crutches. Discharge Instructions: Using Crutches (Non–Weight-Bearing) Your healthcare provider has prescribed crutches for you. Have someone walk with you initially until you feel steady on your feet. Lower both crutches down to the step below. 3. Lean forward at your hips, tighten your core muscles and then push down through both hands and both legs (only place as much weight through the surgical/injured leg as specified by your physician) in order to stand. Remove loose rugs or other small objects from the floor in order to minimize the risk of tripping. Alternate walking method. • Weight bearing as tolerated: Allow as much weight as tolerated through the involved leg. To get a feel for your PWB limit, you may place your surgical/injured leg onto a scale and shift your weight to that side. Hold the armrest of the chair (or chair seat) with the other hand. Take weight through crutch( es) and handrail, put unaffected leg on first step. PDF/X-1:2001 Advice If there is a bannister or rail, please use it. Establish balance. Keep in mind any weight-bearing limits. application/pdf Position yourself so that the backs of your legs are touching the chair. For those who need one crutch to be longer, it will be easy to extend anyone of them. But methods using of different crutches is an important context. You may combine the first two steps if you feel comfortable; advance your non-surgical/non-injured leg and both crutches forward at the same time. How to use crutches while walking. Regain your balance. Your physician will decide whether you are to be non weight bearing, toe-touch weight bearing, partial weight bearing, or weight bearing as tolerated on your surgical/injured leg. Wear appropriately-fitted, low-heeled shoes. The first thing to remember when climbing stairs with crutches is always go up with your good Start by placing both crutches 1-2 inches to the outside of each foot and 6-12 inches in front of you. Using crutches on stairs or steps can be very scary. The therapist will instruct you on the appropriate set-up and fitting of your crutches. Weight-bearing as tolerated (WBAT) or Full weight-bearing (FWB) Hold onto the handrail with one hand. Stand close to the edge of the surface you intend to go down. This is roughly the width of two fingers. Repeat the procedure. Aug 8, 2019 - Kaiser Permanente Santa Rosa Physical Therapy: Partial Weight Bearing on Stairs using Crutches Partial Weight Bearing - The surgeon may specify a certain percentage of weight that is safe to put on the injured leg, e.g. This is especially important when walking on unlevel/uneven surfaces or stairs. Once standing and steady, place one crutch under each arm. Tips for Going Up the Stairs on Crutches. (Push down through the crutch handles with your hands in order to avoid placing too much weight through the surgical/injured leg.). You are allowed to put full weight through your affected (operated/injured) leg i.e. Regain your …